Rest Confident, Your Money is Safe and Secure at Kirtland Credit Union, a message from our President & CEO. Learn More

We have engaged FORVIS, LLP (Attn: Jeff Rosno, 1801 California Street , Ste. 2900, Denver, CO 80202) to perform member verifications. Kindly compare the balance of your accounts on your December 2022 statement WITH YOUR RECORDS. If balances do not agree, please address your discrepancies directly to FORVIS, LLP. Include your name, truncated account number, and an explanation of the difference noted.  A reply is not considered necessary unless a difference is noted.

Kirtland CU branches and the Member Contact Center will be closed on Monday, February 19 in observance of Presidents’ Day.

Credit and debit card fraud is on the rise. Please monitor your account activity for any unusual transactions. >> Learn more

Kirtland Credit Union will never ask you to provide, update, or verify personal or account information through an unsolicited email, phone call, or text message. If you receive an unsolicited email, phone call, or text message, DO NOT RESPOND. Notify us at (505) 254-4369 or 1-800-880-5328.

If you may experience financial hardship related to the government shutdown, we’re here to help. Call 1.800.880.5328 or visit one of our branch locations for more information.

We're Invested

Retirement, investments, financial planning for every stage of life—learn about it all here at Invested,
a blog from your Wealth Management Advisors at Kirtland Financial Services.

7 Tips for Near Retirees to Protect Their Financial Data

By Kirtland Financial Services

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While protecting your financial data has always been important, it grows even more critical as you start planning for retirement. From preserving your retirement savings to maintaining financial independence to avoiding stress, you want to keep all the assets you’ve accumulated by hard work. Here are a few steps you may take to protect your financial information now and in retirement.

Shred Sensitive Documents

Although most financial fraud is committed over the internet these days, some scammers still rely on old-fashioned approaches—and there’s no need to make it easier for them! Always shred financial statements, old tax returns, and any other documents containing personal or financial information before you dispose of them.

Secure Your Mail

On a similar note, you should have a way to secure regular mail, especially if it’s delivered to an unlocked mailbox. Be sure to collect your mail promptly to prevent theft of sensitive documents or financial statements. If you travel frequently and cannot get your mail the day it’s delivered, consider investing in a locking mailbox with a slot.

Secure Your Personal Identification

Keep your Social Security card, passport, and other sensitive identification documents in a secure place, such as a locked safe. Don’t carry these cards or documents in your wallet or leave them in your car unless absolutely necessary, such as when traveling.

Use Strong Passwords and Two-Factor Authentication

Create complex and different passwords for each financial account. Consider using a password manager to store and manage your passwords securely. Whenever possible, enable two-factor authentication for your online financial accounts. This adds an extra layer of security by requiring you to type in a code texted to your phone or sent to your email.

Beware of Phishing Scams

Always be cautious about unsolicited emails, texts, or phone calls requesting personal or financial information. One of a scammer’s most effective tools is a false sense of urgency. Financial agencies understand that you may need to verify that a request is legitimate. Scammers pressure you to make a quick decision by telling you your accounts will be locked, or your credit cards will be canceled if you don’t immediately comply with their requests.

Secure Your Devices

Protect your computer, smartphone, and other devices with strong, up-to-date security software. Encrypt your data and use screen locks with PINs or biometrics. Always avoid conducting sensitive financial transactions on public wireless networks. If you absolutely must use public Wi-Fi, use a VPN.

Consider a Credit Freeze

If you’re not actively seeking new credit, consider placing a credit freeze on your credit reports. This restricts access to your credit information, making it far more difficult for identity thieves to open new accounts in your name.

Taking these precautions can significantly reduce the risk of falling victim to identity theft as you approach retirement. Consider consulting with a financial professional to manage your accounts. Have them set up in a way that manages the risk of fraud and provides a secure transition into retirement.

The opinions voiced in this material are for general information only and are not intended to provide specific advice or recommendations for any individual.

This article was prepared by WriterAccess.

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